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English-German Dictionary

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English-German Translation of
bis dorthin darf

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Term:
bis dorthin darf sie mich einholen, früher nicht  
by poietikos, 2022-08-09, 13:02  like dislike  Spam?  88.103.230....
Wenn ich auf der Straße gehe und eine Straßenbahn mich einholen will, dann merke ich mir immer einen Punkt, bis dorthin darf sie mich einholen, früher nicht!

“When I walk down the street and want to catch a tram, I always target a certain point ***

I can't translate the rest.
Answer:
by Windfall (GB), Last modified: 2022-08-09, 15:27  like dislike  Spam?  
 #937037
When I'm walking on the street and a tram is trying to catch up with me, I always make a note of a point by which it's OK for it to catch up with me, not before!
dict.cc: catch up einholen
The person plays a game with themselves where when a tram's behind them and coming their way, they set a point they want to get to by the time the tram catches up with them.
Chat:    
by sunfunlili (DE/GB), 2022-08-09, 15:25  like dislike  Spam?  
 #937039
another superstition game ..... ??
Chat:    
by MichaelK (US), 2022-08-09, 16:03  like dislike  Spam?  
 #937041
Yes, another one! Popper calls these habits eine Sammlung von "Marotten." Nice.
Chat:    
by Sasso', 2022-08-09, 16:07  like dislike  Spam?  193.187.3...
 #937042
Richtig esoterisch wie sich ein Mensch dabei vervielfacht ("the person --> themselves ... their way ... they")
Answer:
by MichaelK (US), Last modified: 2022-08-09, 19:50  like dislike  Spam?  
 #937043
Maschinen werden im Ausgangstext vermenschlicht! Ich glaube, eine Straßenbahn möchte niemanden / niefrauden einholen. Schon gar nicht Popper.  :-)
Chat:    
by Windfall (GB), Last modified: 2022-08-09, 16:21  like dislike  Spam?  
 #937044
4;Sasso, surely you're familiar with the singular use of they in English? Wikipedia(EN): Singular_they
It's been around since the 14th century. I've been using it this way since I was a child. I can't be the first English speaker to use this in front of you.
Wiktionary says Sie is also grammatically plural, even when used to refer to a single person: https://de.wiktionary.org/wiki/Sie
Answer:
A bit perplexing  #937048
by poietikos, 2022-08-09, 20:05  like dislike  Spam?  88.103.231....
Now I have:

When I walk down the street and a tram is trying to catch up with me, I always make note of a certain point. Up to that point it can catch up with me, but not before!

Shouldn't he say the part of the train that comes after - not before - the point? I imagine the scenario thus: He runs to keep ahead of the designated point. If he keeps ahead of the point, he wins. If it moves past him, he loses. Am imagining this correctly?

The philosophical and scientific passages of Popper's text are relatively easy to translate. But these quotations are often troublesome.
Chat:    
by MichaelK (US), Last modified: 2022-08-09, 21:19  like dislike  Spam?  
 #937050
I don't think the person saying the bit about the tram runs or even changes his stride. If he beats the tram, he feels it's his lucky day. If the tram beats him, he feels that something bad will happen to him. It's a mental game, not a physical contest. But I see your point--we really don't know for certain the hopes or fears of the person quoted.

In my view, throwing dice is not a good equivalent to counting buttons. Dice gives you a number from one to six. But both touching the buttons with your fingertip and pulling petals are binary 'yes-no-yes-no' schemes. You're not interested in a number.
Answer:
counting-out  #937051
by Poietikos, 2022-08-09, 21:08  like dislike  Spam?  88.103.231....
I will have to leave the translation about the tram as it is for the time being.

The problem with counting-out in English is that it is normally done for selecting someone (as a leader, for instance). It usually has nothing to do with luck or destiny. I suppose it does in the example of pulling petals, but I am using that for another example (see the question below).
Answer:
counting-out  #937053
by Poietikos, 2022-08-09, 21:14  like dislike  Spam?  88.103.231....
What I meant to say is that counting-out in English usually doesn't have anything to do with "positing" (Setzung) in Popper's sense. If the last petal goes with "she loves me," then she really does love me, according to the superstition. That is not how counting-out, e.g. eeny meeny miny moe, works. There is no superstition involved. The kids who do this use it only to make a selection, not to decide what is "meant" to be.
Answer:
by MichaelK (US), Last modified: 2022-08-09, 21:53  like dislike  Spam?  
 #937054
If the last button you come to is a yes-button, she loves me /  I should apply for this job / I should buy a house / whatever. Same as petal pulling. But if the 'yes-no-yes-no' garment button scheme is known in the English-speaking world, translation problem solved. Otherwise you could explain it, perhaps in a translator's note?.
Answer:
Yes, but....  #937055
by Poietikos, 2022-08-09, 21:26  like dislike  Spam?  88.103.231....
I am using petal pulling for the example of the Orakelblume (see below).
Answer:
by MichaelK (US), Last modified: 2022-08-09, 21:33  like dislike  Spam?  
 #937056
Ah yes. Our posts crossed, sorry.
Answer:
As to the 'singular use of they', surely there is something contrived or ill-conceived about it  #937107
by Proiteus-, 2022-08-12, 15:45  like dislike  Spam?  193.83.224....
2. In anaphoric reference to a singular noun or pronoun.Use of they to refer to a singular antecedent has sometimes been considered erroneous.
https://www.oed.com/view/Entry/200700

A singular, after all, belongs both to nouns or pronouns AND verbs. Here English grammar requires the plural pronouns referring to a singular noun or pronoun to be followed by the plural form of the verb rather than the singular. No doubt this introduces an element of blatant confusion worthy of all our sexually or gender-wise confused contemporaries.
Answer:
Other instances of the plural designating a single person  #937111
by Proiteus-, 2022-08-12, 16:50  like dislike  Spam?  193.83.224....
(a) The royal we, majestic plural (pluralis majestatis), or royal plural
Wikipedia(EN): Royal_we

(b) The pluralis modestiae
use of the first person plural instead of first-person singular to refer to oneself more modestly: e.g. “We believe that this should change” instead of “I believe that […]”
https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q256495

NB: In both cases the logic of grammar has plural nouns / pronouns being followed by plural verb forms!!!
Answer:
LINK  #937112
by Proiteus-, 2022-08-12, 16:51  like dislike  Spam?  193.83.224....
Chat:    
by MichaelK (US), 2022-08-12, 18:32  like dislike  Spam?  
 #937114
The supposedly  modest "We believe...." could draw "What do you mean 'we' ? You got a mouse in your pocket?"  from a smart-ass American.  » Edit
Chat:    
Oddly my user name sports a parasite 'i' in this thread.   #937118
by Proteus-, 2022-08-13, 07:57  like dislike  Spam?  62.46.128....
Chat:    
by MichaelK (US), 2022-08-13, 15:32  like dislike  Spam?  
 #937122
Some other threads as well:
forum.dict.cc: proiteus-
Answer:
re #937048  #937127
by Lllama (GB/AT), Last modified: 2022-08-14, 10:52  like dislike  Spam?  
Shouldn't he say the part of the train that comes after - not before - the point? I imagine the scenario thus: He runs to keep ahead of the designated point. If he keeps ahead of the point, he wins. If it moves past him, he loses. Am imagining this correctly?

I see it like this:
A tram is coming up behind him, say 100m away. He looks ahead and picks a point, perhaps a particular shop, a street light or a junction; he has to reach this point before the tram catches up with him and therefore reaches the point first.

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